Bogota, Colombia – City Guide for Nomads and Expats

Updated in 2022.

Bogota is the capital of Colombia.

The financial and business capital of the country. The third-largest city in Latin America after Sao Paulo and Mexico City. You’ll meet smart, driven people who speak pretty good English. Over the years, Bogota has had to cope with an influx of migrants from the countryside looking for work, and as a consequence the city comes across as poorly planned and a bit chaotic in certain areas.

However, it’s still a can’t-miss city if you come to Colombia.  The city has plenty to offer in terms of dining, dancing and entertainment! 

POPULATION: 7,700,000


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RENT AN APARTMENT IN BOGOTA

$500.00. You can find places for less, even in La Candeleria, but in north of the city, $500.00 is the least you’re going to pay for an apartment. Some good deals can still be found in Chapinero, about 4 km from the Zona Rosa.

 

THINGS TO DO IN BOGOTA

Visit the Museo Nacional de Colombia.

Visit the hummingbird sanctuary, the Observatorio de Colibríes.

Hike to a waterfall! Check out the Cascada La Chorrera.

Hike up to Mirador La Piedra for spectacular views of the city.

Head to Colombia’s coffee triangle (eje cafetero), starting with Manizales or Ibagué.

 

IS BOGOTA, COLOMBIA SAFE?

Slightly dangerous. Don’t believe any hype about Bogota being as safe as any other major Latin American city. It isn’t. You need to be extremely careful in certain areas (I wouldn’t recommend even going to south Bogota unless you’re familiar with the area), and I don’t advise walking alone at night. 

 

BEST BARS & NIGHTLIFE IN BOGOTA

9/10 

Like Medellin, an overwhelming number of nightspots in this city.

To make this massive ciudad more digestible, I’ll recommend three areas that are relatively close to one another: La Candeleria, Zona Rosa and Chapinero. La Candeleria is touristy, Zona Rosa is upscale and Chapinero is popular among university students. Pick a bar according to your tastes.

My Latin Life recommends:

El Chango Bar:I highly suggest this place for mingling and meeting people.

Kaputt Club Bogotá: Cool night club with arcade games, fire pit, a rooftop, and several different rooms with different vibes.

Clandestino Club: Mediocre nightclub with a techno or reggaeton DJ depending on the night.

Presea Bar: Good spot for dancing, reggaeton, and salsa.

Cabrera Resto-Bar: Nice, classy spot for dinner and drinks.

Ovejo Café Bar: Familiar spot for burgers and beers in an upbeat environment.

 

BEST CAFES IN BOGOTA FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

Bogota has a lot of nice cafes for getting work done. The vibe is often very frenetic or loud in Bogota cafes so you may want to work from the apartment. But then again, you might want to work in a cafe to network with entrepreneurs or see the beautiful people passing by. There are many Starbucks locations in Bogota.

Cafes that My Latin Life recommends:

Colo Coffee: Free wifi and friendly employees.

Tostao Cafe y Pan: Cool cafe with a more relaxed vibe good for coworking.

 

COST OF LIVING IN BOGOTA, COLOMBIA

The following data is from Expatistan, a crowdsourced database of prices and cost of living around the world. In our experience, the data tends to underestimate cost of living, so take the following as the minimum you might need to live here.

*Figures are listed in USD

You’ll need a minimum of $964 USD/month to live in Bogota, Colombia

cost-of-living-bogota

HOW TO GET TO BOGOTA

Bogota has a very well connected international airport. Flights to and from Miami are often super cheap. Panama City is only a 90 minute flight and Quito is a 100 minute flight.

 

FINAL THOUGHTS ON BOGOTA

A very hip and modern city. However, not everyone will like it. Bogota suits a particular type of person. For instance, a person who loves New York, Mexico City or Toronto will probably love Bogota.

If you are a big city type, somewhat business-oriented, don’t mind cold weather, and speak Spanish fluently, there’s a good chance you’ll be well-suited to Bogota.

If you are planning to relocate to Colombia and don’t have experience living in a massive city, I’d suggest a few months in Medellin or Bucaramanga first.

If  you’re just visiting Colombia, though, definitely take some time to check out this city.

OVERALL RATING: 8.75/10

 

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